Water Conservation

NTMWD Eases Water Restrictions


The water supply reservoirs have reached sufficient levels and capacities to allow the NTMWD to ease water restrictions. Beginning May 1, 2015, NTMWD will terminate all drought stages and will implement its Water Conservation plan.

The water supply reservoirs have reached sufficient levels and capacities to allow the NTMWD to ease water restrictions. Beginning May 1, 2015, NTMWD will terminate all drought stages and will implement its Water Conservation plan that limits landscape watering to no more than two days per week, and only if needed. For now, customers are urged to keep automatic sprinkler systems off and run on manual mode when necessary.

Conservation, as always, is vital to our water supply and the City continues to emphasize watering wisely. Based on periodic rainfall over the last several weeks, there may be no need for twice per week watering in May. In the months ahead, when the hot dry conditions may require more frequent watering, only water if needed to maintain a healthy lawn.

The Conservation Plan guidelines prohibits outdoor watering from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (May 1 - October 31).

Foundations and landscaping, including grass, shrubs and trees, may be watered for up to 2 hours any day by a hand-held hose or soaker hose.

Hydro-seeding, hydro-mulching or sprigging are prohibited.

For additional information please visit the website, www.parkertexas.us or call City Hall 972-442-6811.

NTMWD Press Release


Why We Should Conserve Water


An adequate supply of high quality water has become a critical issue for the future prosperity of Texas, where water is a limited resource. Due to increasing population, water demand is projected to exceed supply by 2030, based on current use rates. Protecting, managing and planning for the wise use of our water resources is an efficient and effective strategy to meet future water supply needs.

Actually, the entire state is banking on water-saving strategies. Texas' 50-year water plan envisions getting about 25% of its supplies through improved conservation, including better irrigation techniques, low-flow indoor plumbing fixtures and reuse of existing water supplies. Unfortunately, water conservation alone will not meet all our needs. Future water supplies will need to be developed to meet the water demands of a population estimated to exceed 3.8 million by the year 2060.

Water Conservation and Drought Contingency Plan


Recognizing the need for efficient use of existing water supplies, the Texas Commission of Environmental Quality (TCEQ) has developed guidelines and requirements governing the development of water conservation and drought contingency plans for public water suppliers.

The City Plan


The City of Parker's current Water Conservation and Drought Contingency follows the recommendations from the North Texas Municipal Water District (NTMWD) and meets the guidelines and requirements of TCEQ.

Resolution 2011 - 346